CANADALAND Book Tour • May 23

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CANADALAND BOOK TOUR
Tuesday May 23, 2017 • Mills Hardware (95 King St. E., Hamilton)
Doors 7:00pm, Show 7:30pm
Tickets $15 (+SC) advance, $20 door

CANADALAND has disrupted the way the Canadian media works. Its crowdfunded model means fierce independence and in a few short years CANADALAND has broken major news stories, exposed scandals, and held the media to account. Host Jesse Brown has won the National Magazine Award for Humour and the Hillman Prize for Investigative Reporting. He is also a co-founder of Bitstrips, makers of Bitmoji, a cartooning app used by millions.

To celebrate the release of CANADALAND’s book of dick jokes about prime ministers, Jesse Brown will be performing live across this country. Join him for a slideshow journey through the past, present and future of Canada. Through stories, cartoons, music, video, and possibly interpretive dance, Jesse will shed light on the things that are actually interesting about Canada, most of which are awful. A book-signing will follow each performance.

CANADALAND’s The Imposter • Feb 3

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CANADALAND’s The Imposter presents Hamilton, The Musical
Friday Feb 3, 2017 • Mills Hardware (95 King St. E., Hamilton)
Doors 8:30pm, show 9:30pm (event ends at 11:30pm)
Tickets: $15.00 (+SC) advance, $20 at the door

Direct from CANADALAND comes The Imposter — a show about love for music, comic books, movies, video games, novels, comedy and everything else. Named one of The Onion AV Club’s best podcasts of 2016, The Imposter is celebrating Steeltown with a live taping: Hamilton, The Musical. It’s a night of music, stories and interviews, with writer, actor and self-professed “drag queen extraordinaire” Sky Gilbert, performance artist Kiera Boult, and Sally McKay, who was making GIFs before GIFs were cool.

Music throughout the night is provided by sax punk band Zena.

Echo Artist Talks: Gord Bond • Feb 23

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ECHO ARTIST TALKS: GORD BOND
Thursday, February 23 • Mills Hardware (95 King St. E., Hamilton)
Doors 7pm, Talk 7:30pm • Free

The Echo Artist Talks series continues on Thursday February 23, when the Hamilton Arts Council’s Visual Arts Committee welcomes Hamilton-based painter Gord Bond to Mills Hardware. Bond recently presented his solo exhibition of new paintings, Almost Human Nature, his recent exhibition at Dundas’ Carnegie Gallery. 

Gord Bond was born in Hamilton, Ontario, where he still lives and exhibits his paintings today. While doing an undergraduate in Science at McMaster University, Bond’s love of drawing and painting compelled him to switch majors to the Fine Arts. Bond received an Honours Bachelor of Arts degree at McMaster University in 2012. Upon completion of his Undergraduate Degree, Gord immediately applied and gained acceptance to York University to work towards his Masters in Fine Art. Since completing his Masters in 2014, Bond has continued to create paintings focusing on his interest in the human figure coupled with an urge to experiment with form, colour and mark-making.

Echo Artist Talks is a project of the Hamilton Arts Council Visual Arts Committee that provides a forum for both local and visiting artists exhibiting in Hamilton galleries to share their experiences with the local community. Hosted monthly at Mills Hardware in downtown Hamilton, each talk includes a Q&A session and opportunity for informal networking before and after the talk with a cash bar available on site. Doors open at 7:00 in advance of the start of the artist’s talk at 7:30.

 

The Cerebral Cafe: Space • Feb 9

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THE CEREBRAL CAFE: SPACE
Thursday February 9, 2017 • Mills Hardware (95 King St. E., Hamilton)
Doors 6:30pm, talk 7:00pm (event ends at 11pm) All-Ages

>> Free! Preregister Here <<

Want to hear about fascinating research on mind-expanding topics? Interested in coffee and enlightening discussions in friendly environments? Come to Mills Hardware for community coffeehouse series The Cerebral Cafe. The latest instalment of the series — organized by The Cerebral Coffeehouse, a graduate organization from McMaster University funded by the School of Graduate Studies’ S.P.I.C.E.S initiative — focuses on Space. The purpose of the organization is to provide themed coffeehouse events featuring academics and professionals from the Hamilton community, creating a positive space for community members to engage with researchers and share knowledge. Guest speakers at this event include Joe Muto (MCIP, RPP),  Manager of Current Planning at the City of Brantford and former Senior Planner with the City of Hamilton’s Planning and Economic Development Division – Urban Renewal Section; Andy RoddickAssistant Professor in the Anthropology Department at McMaster; and Laura Parker, Associate Professor in the Physics & Astronomy Department at McMaster. Admission is free but don’t forget to register via Ticketfly so that organizers can make sure there is enough room for your coffee, snacks and ideas!

The PussyCat Lounge Literary Salon • Nov 19

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THE PUSSYCAT LOUNGE LITERARY SALON
Featuring NAIRN HOLTZ and BETH MURCH
Saturday November 18, 2016 • Doors 7:00pm • 19+
Mills Hardware (95 King St. E., Hamilton)
Tickets: $10 (+SC) advance & door
>> Buy Tickets Here <<

The PussyCat Lounge is a literary salon for queer women & their friends – all are welcome. Featured guests are Nairne Holtz & Beth Murch. Michael Simlais deejaying.

Nairn Holtz began her writing career in the early 90s with the creation of a queer kinky punk porn ’zine, Pornorama, that generated sales and mail from around the world and interesting personal adventures. A straight couple who ran a fetish group offered to back her financially and elevate Pornorama to magazine status. She pooh-poohed this offer she didn’t think was terribly practical: “Thanks, that’s sweet, but I’m going to library school.” Today she is a librarian and author of two books: The Skin Beneath (Insomniac, 2007), which was shortlisted for Quebec’s McAuslan Prize and This One’s Going to Last Forever (Insomniac, 2009), a Lambda Literary Award finalist. Her new novel, Femme Confidential, will be published in the fall of 2017.

Debra Anderson is the recipient of the Writers’ Trust of Canada’s Dayne Ogilvie Prize for Emerging LGBT Writers. Her work has been anthologized in Persistence: All Ways Butch and Femme, Brazen Femme: Queering Femininity, Girl Fever: 69 Stories of Sudden Sex for Lesbians. Herizons Magazine described her novel, Code White (McGilligan, 2005) as “…a book that meets your eye, has a good handshake, and looks killer in a pair of fishnets.”

Beth Murch is a village wyse womyn, radical reproductive justice activist, birth worker, and nationally competing spoken word artist. She has performed across Canada and in the United States, creating and disturbing peace with her literary craft. A lone, tender-yet-fierce voice that speaks of love, spirituality, feminism, female sexuality, mental health, and loneliness, Murch’s humour and vulnerability lingers with audiences. Her passions include placentae, memento mori, cat memes, herbalism, and religious kitsch.

Echo Artist Talks: Jody Joseph • Nov 17

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ECHO ARTIST TALKS: JODY JOSEPH
Thu Nov 17, 2016 / 7:00pm doors, 7:30pm talk / Free

Chicago-born, Dundas-based painter-collagist Jody Joseph talks about her paintings and collages rooted in the quarter-century she has spent as an student, painter, teacher & resident of  Montecastello di Vibio, a small hill town in Umbria, Italy. The works form the exhibition Montecastello a Memoria, running Nov 18-Dec 18 at Gallery on the Bay.  

Echo Artist Talks is a project of the Hamilton Arts Council’s Visual Arts Committee that provides a forum for both local and visiting artists exhibiting in Hamilton galleries to share their experiences with the local community. Hosted monthly at Mills Hardware, each talk includes a Q&A session and opportunity for informal networking before and after the talk, with a cash bar available. Doors open at 7pm in advance of the start of the artist’s talk at 7:30pm.

The next Echo Artist Talk, featuring sculptor Paul Cvetich, will take place Thursday January 19, presented by the McMaster Museum of Art.

Jon Fine in conversation w/Stuart Berman • Sept 18

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JON FINE in conversation with STUART BERMAN
Sunday September 18, 2016 • Mills Hardware (95 King St. E., Hamilton)
Doors 6:00pm, Talk 7:00pm 

FREE ADMISSION • BOOKS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE

“Jon Fine has done something miraculous: he managed to drag me through a time in my life that I hated and made me actually miss it. Both a hilarious personal memoir and an obsessive guide to that weird moment in underground music before the great tsunami of the Internet changed everything forever, Your Band Sucks reminds you that one self-confessed rock-nerd’s journey through rejection, triumph, and cheap motels is as universal as any well-told story.” — James Murphy, LCD Soundsystem

Join Jon Fine — guitarist for ’80s American underground rock heroes Bitch Magnet, and now an award-winning journalist — as he discusses his recent memoir, Your Band Sucks: What I Saw at Indie Rock’s Failed Revolution* (*But Can No Longer Hear) with Pitchfork writer Stuart Berman.

Jon Fine spent nearly 30 years performing and recording with bands that played aggressive and challenging underground rock music, and, as he writes, at no point were any of those bands “ever threatened, even distantly, by actual fame.” Yet when the members of his 1980s post-hardcore band Bitch Magnet came together for an unlikely reunion tour in 2011, diehard fans traveled from far and wide to attend their shows, despite creeping middle-age obligations of parenthood and 9-to-5 jobs.

Their devotion was testament to the remarkable staying power of indie culture. In indie rock’s pre-Internet glory days, bands like Bitch Magnet, Black Flag, Mission of Burma, and Sonic Youth—operating far outside commercial radio and major label promotion—attracted fans through word of mouth, college DJs, record stores, and zines. They found glory in all-night recording sessions, shoestring van tours, and endless appearances in grimy clubs. Some bands with a foot in this scene, like REM and Nirvana, eventually attained mainstream success. Many others, like Bitch Magnet, were beloved only by the most obsessed fans of the time.

Your Band Sucks is an insider’s look at that fascinating, outrageous culture—how it emerged and evolved, how it grappled with the mainstream and vice versa, and its odd rebirth in recent years as countless bands reunited, briefly and bittersweetly. With backstage access to many key characters on the scene—and plenty of wit and sharply worded opinion—Fine delivers a memoir that affectionately yet critically portrays an important, heady moment in music history.

 

Praise for Your Band Sucks: What I Saw at Indie Rock’s Failed Revolution* (*But Can No Longer Hear):

“[E]verything a cult-fave musician’s memoir should be: It’s a seductively readable book that requires no previous knowledge of the author, Bitch Magnet or any other band with which he’s played.” —Janet Maslin, The New York Times

“For those of us who loved and lived indie rock in the 1990s, we were never sure if our alienation meant we were part of a revolution or just making the best of a chronic condition. Jon Fine captures what it meant to find a home in the margins — the dark humor, instant camaraderie, and strange hope of loud music, grimy road trips, bad food and worse booze. And then what it’s like, decades later, to find yourself a tourist in the same places, grown up but still maturing.” — Ana Marie Cox, Chief Political Correspondent, MTV News, author of Dog Days

“Fine can write, and because he doesn’t mind making himself look like a jerk, he summons up all the idealism and the cluelessness, the talent and the posturing, that went with the territory . . . Indie was, as Fine puts it, a ‘culture that unorphaned you,’ and he’s especially good on the haven that post-punk music offered Gen X misfits.” — The Atlantic

Your Band Sucks is a fantastic document of a culture-defining era of rock music. It paints a detailed portrait of the scene before corporations bought music’s soul. A tremendous read.” — Stuart Braithwaite, Mogwai

“The story of the indie rock era has rarely been told as well as it has in Your Band Sucks . . . Written with both anthropological detachment and deep romanticism about the making of music, Fine’s book belongs on the shelf alongside Michael Azerrad’s Our Band Could Be Your Life.” —Salon

“Like Anthony Bourdain’s Kitchen Confidential, but for would-be rock stars who live like train hobos and perform for dozens of fans a night.” — Men’s Health

“More striking than Fine’s clever words is his incisive commentary, which examines everything we’ve come to know about music in the digital age, from cyber communities to music streaming services to major record labels.” — Esquire.com

Your Band Sucks is a beautiful, balls-out, hilarious, rich memoir about one guitarist’s epic immersion in the world of indie music—but it’s also the story of an entire generation and time. Has anyone ever written a better book about indie music? I don’t think so.” —Kate Christensen, author of PEN/Faulkner award-winning novel The Great Man and Blue Plate Special: An Autobiography of My Appetites

“By telling his own story, warts, bruises, drug-induced facial tics, and all, [Fine] has recaptured a time when music felt, for many well-educated, middle-class kids now having achieved a certain age, like something much more important than mere entertainment.” —The Boston Globe

“‪I never attended a Bitch Magnet concert, so I can’t speak to whether the band sucked. But this book is a funny, thoughtful, frank, whip-smart and moving chronicle of being a particular kind of young at a particular time in America. It definitely doesn’t suck‬.” ‬‬ —Kurt Andersen, host of Studio 360, author of True Believers

“If you want to know how indie rock rolled in the forlorn and scorned mid ’80s and early ’90s, you won’t find a more vividly rendered, incisive, and self-deprecatingly humorous portrayal of it than Jon Fine’s Your Band Sucks.” —The Stranger

“Exhilarating. Like a song that appears out of nowhere to exactly fill a hole in your life that was never apparent, Your Band Sucks makes vividly real the ingredients that went into ‘80’s indie rock. With a cultural critic’s reach and an insider’s self-critical insights, Jon Fine has produced the definitively anthropological “why” thousands of bands like his existed and what the accomplished.” —Ira Robbins, editor and publisher, Trouser Press

Post-Season Pitch Talks • Mon Nov 16

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On the heels of an heroic Blue Jays season, baseball lovers’ delight Pitch Talks returns to Mills Hardware on Monday, November 16.

This fan favourite, which wowed SRO crowds at Mills during its September debut, promises to deliver a night of baseball storytelling, analysis & debate! And after the past month in Jays land, there’s definitely a lot to talk about!

Pitch Talks will offer the faithful a breakdown of what’s next for the Blue Jays with an esteemed panel of insiders:

  • Stephen Brunt (Sportsnet)
  • Jeff Blair (Sportsnet)
  • Steve Milton (Hamilton Spectator)
  • Ben Nicholson-Smith (Sportsnet)

The night will also feature Ashley Stephenson from the Canadian women’s national baseball team to talk about her experiences in the game!

The Pitch Talks team has also called up a Blue Jays “Fanel” of baseball diehards to talk about the postseason and what lies beyond:

  • Chris Johnston Sportsnet
  • Nick Dika bassist for The Arkells
  • Kieran Roy co-owner, Arts & Crafts
  • Scott Crawford Director of Operations, Canadian Baseball Hall Of Fame

Get your tickets here!